Click to enlarge map

How might a cable car effect bush walkers? MWCC spokesperson Chris Oldfield argued it would be virtually zero because “the cable car would be high above the tree-line.”

Now you can see for yourself.

These “photospheres” take you to the crossroads on the mountain where a cable car would not be a distant object: it would pass directly over your head.

All ten crossings are well-known, well loved and close-by. Only one is difficult to reach. Thousands of people enjoy traversing these tracks each year for recreation and adventure; and have done so, undisturbed, for generations.

The Wellington Park Management Trust is required to “protect the natural and cultural values of all established tracks” and are guided by community opinion. You would be helping them and every track user by writing to the WPMT saying you have seen the track cross-overs. State your opinion.

THE CLIMBERS path

Click image to view Photosphere

Click image to view Photosphere

A faint path leads to this remote bowl of vertical rock face and fallen tors: The Amphitheatre. A dozen rock climbs (and one tricky scramble) lead from here to the summit. You can see a minuscule dare devil slack-lining across the pipe’s lip in this photo—but for how much longer if cable cars are permitted to rumble closely overhead every ten minutes?


ORGAN PIPES TRACK

Click image to view Photosphere

Click image to view Photosphere

The Organ Pipes track is the iconic walk of the mountain. The cableway would cross its path directly overhead here.


PINNACLE ROAD

COMING SOON! Photosphere

COMING SOON! Photosphere

Crossing the heritage-listed Pinnacle Road, 300 000 mountain visitors every year would see the cable cars over-cross the road twice: going up and coming back down. Each “skybus” is 7 metres long, about half the length of a Metro bus.


NORTH-SOUTH MTB TRAIL

Click image to view Photosphere

Click image to view Photosphere

The North-South mountain-bike trail is long and difficult and free. Riders love it. It is the mountain’s most popular cross-country riding route, but walkers traverse it too.


MYRTLE GULLY TRACK

Click image to view Photosphere

Click image to view Photosphere

One of the mountain’s most historic and romantic tracks, Myrtle Gull Track winds through dense, shaded rainforest. The cableway would cross where it meets the Guy Faulks Rivulet.


MAIN FIRE TRAIL

Click image to view Photosphere

Click image to view Photosphere

The Main Fire Trail is a popular park access walking and trail running track. It also provides access to the Tip Top and Breakneck mountain biker tracks. The cable car take-off would cut through the forest on the left.


HANG GLIDERS AIRWAY

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Another place bisected by the 2 kilometre-long cableway is the air. Para-gliding on the mountain “has a potential to be iconic”, says the CEO of the tourism industry council Luke Martin, but para- and hang gliders who enjoy uninterrupted flightways across the entire eastern face of the park today would be thwarted by aerial cables and flying skybuses. The cableway would appropriate the airspace of dozens of avian species in the Park as well.


Other crossings

As the map (link below) shows, the cableway would also pass over the Lenah Valley Track and the Old Farm Road MTB trail. In addition, the Access Road required to reach the cable car base station would obliterate sections of both Tip Top MTB trails.

HELP SAVE THE PARK!

The Wellington Park Management Trust is required to “protect the natural and cultural values of all established tracks” and you would be helping every track user by reminding the WPMT that you have seen the track cross-overs and you request the Trust protect them from continuous fly-overs.

CREDITS

The photosphere “bubblies” were shot April-May 2019 by Sonia Caton, David Day, Luke Harwood, Bernard Lloyd and Phil Stignant. © SHUF 2019

Note: “Bubbli” images are best viewed on an iPad.

MORE MOUNTAIN PHOTOSPHERES:

Hill 32: Ground Zero for the drill sites