Soak in the scenery... Breathe crisp clean air. Skim misty clouds. Frolick in fresh snow.
— MWCC
The mountain is mountainously high, it is exposed and it is the abode of freezing winds, dense clouds, cold rain and fierce gales. The cable car is not about frolicking, it is not about the Mountain, it is about being on top looking down.
— Geoff Law

Freezing cold... but rarely snowy

The Mountain is one of the coldest places in Tasmania, and because of its high winds it feels 'freezing cold', but it is infrequently snow-coated because it is not consistently cold and dry enough to freeze the moisture in the air and create snow.

In another paradox, when it does snow, the best place to be is along the Pinnacle Road above the Springs, where big fluffy flakes drift down and settle, everyone can spread out, and be sheltered. The cable car goes nowhere near The Springs.

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Ubiquitous Cloud Cover

The MWCC claims that the summit is only cloud-covered for 20% of the year. Thirty year records (opposite) show that, excepting February and March, the pinnacle is cloud-covered for 50% of the days in every month.

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Regular Gales

Almost buried in the MWCC website is a startling admission. One of the reasons for the pinnacle building's location is, the MWCC states, "to shield the Centre from the frequent gale force winds". Yes. The highest wind speed ever recorded in Tasmania was at the summit of kunyani.

Imagine being carried high in the air, into a gale: whole trees bending below you, flying twigs hitting the cabin, knowing that something more "severe" may await you at the Pinnacle, howling over the summit, tearing bits off buildings, making walking upright hazardous. The winds on kunanyi can exceed all gale forces.

For approximately one third of the year, the mountain top is subject to a gale force wind exceeding the capacity of the cable car to operate comfortably.

Read More: High Winds rock cable car

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Wettest spot in Hobart

A not untypical day at The Pinnacle. A metre and a half of rain fall upon the Summit—it is Hobart’s wettest place.